Aftershow – your new way to feeling like a man or links and reflections extending from Friday’s show. 26 March 2010.

On Friday morning, your regular host, Katherine Lim was joined by longtime friend, Justine Poon to present a show about the writing side of the alternative arts banner that we hold. We wanted to provide links to the many writers, programs and websites mentioned on the show and also to extend the discussion so please feel free to drop comments!

The guest we interviewed was Nick Keys whose work steps outside of what we would think of as the normal definitions of writing – something like found art as poetry via a determined process that emulates chance. In other words, just as contradictory as the many hidden claims made by writing in the normative style, only not hidden. Something to puzzle over, and think over, I guess, if you are willing to let set definitions float a bit. Links to his work are in the post below.

One of the things that most interest Katherine and I, and Nick as well, about the arts is the possibility of creating a really dynamic culture and a flow of ideas that keeps the creative impulse fresh and critical. It’s about always being excited about some new work, in thrall with an interesting idea, the thrill of collaboration and above all, never becoming complacent in your own work or thoughts, whilst at the same time not seeing yourself as the centre of the universe.

THOUGHTS from the show

Of what use is a writing created out of theories of writing (i.e. poetics)?

Can poetry, can writing be useful? How?

Are eco-poetics – that movement of poetry that takes you outside of yourself and back into nature – potentially places (or sites) where our internal attitudes towards the environment can change?

How much freedom is there in the current language to express ‘truth’?

THOUGHTS in general

In what ways can all sorts of artists and people interested in arts be connected today?

What do you think makes for a dynamic culture?

What do you feel is missing from the Sydney arts scene?

What do you think is good about it already? Is there a particular project or collective that you love or are involved in?

LINKS

One of the greatest websites on the Internet, if you’re into poetry. This is a great archive of readings, lectures, radio shows and poetry, so much poetry from the PennSound website coming out of the University of Pennsylvania.
http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/

The recording of Charles Bernstein reading ‘Thank You for Saying Thank You’ can be found at about 43minutes in of this one hour of insane radio, hosted by Kenneth Goldsmith:

The full poem from which the extract of Mei-Mei Bersenbrugge’s ‘I love artists’ was taken from here:

Something we discussed in the interview but didn’t get a chance to play on the show was Joan Retallack’s ‘Woman in a Chinese Room’, which can be found here:

Hopefully when I’ve formatted the files into a manageable size, we’ll be able to put the full interview up.

The other greatest website on the Internet, which we didn’t get a chance to mention on the show is Ubuweb, an absolutely stunning archive of 20th Century writers reading their work. A lot of concrete poetry and avant-garde movements are represented. It was started in 1996 by Kenneth Goldsmith who is closely involved with PennSound as well.
http://www.ubu.com/

I can no longer find the link to the debate on Pam Brown’s blog which was mentioned on the show (a fierce discussion started off by Pam Brown when she raised the question of why there was this ‘new lyricism’ emerging in poetry) but below is the long-running online magazine of poetry, Jacket, which was started and is co-edited by John Tranter and Pam Brown.
http://jacketmagazine.com/00/home.shtml

The Red Room Company was also mentioned near the end of the interview. They are a group in Australia doing interesting things with poetry.
http://redroomcompany.org/

All pieces played are the intellectual property of their creators and no copyright infringement is intended. In the spirit of fair use, extracts of the recordings they came from were used.

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